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Chiriqui Gold Pendant

Chiriqui Gold Pendant


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Ancient Americas

In 1911, Henry Walters purchased almost 100 gold artifacts from the Chiriqui region of western Panama, creating a core collection of ancient American art. Now strengthened by long-term loans and generous gifts from private collectors, the Ancient American collection features exceptional works of art from Central and South America, including masterpieces from the Mesoamerican Olmec, Aztec, and Maya cultures, as well as the Moche and Inca peoples of eastern South America.

The artworks revolve around a core set of themes, including agricultural fertility, the role of the ruler in forging a bond between the natural and supernatural realms, and the practice of shamanism, which included the ritual of uniting with an animal spirit.

Most of the objects, made of gold, jade, turquoise, shell, or clay, were found in tombs, intended to equip the deceased for his journey to the next world. The ancient American art collection includes extraordinary sculptures, masks, game objects, figurative and painted vases, as well as gold jewelry and ritual works. The installation is especially strong in objects from Mesoamerica (including present-day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras, the Intermediate Area of Central America and northern Colombia), and the Andean civilizations of Ecuador and Peru. The collection provides a comprehensive overview of the enormous variety of artistic expression from these regions.


Diquis-Chiriquí Eagle, Gold Pendant. .

Diquis-Chiriquí Eagle, Gold Pendant
The Pre-Columbian pendant features a tumbaga eagle with a puncture at the back signifying the death of the owner, set in high karat gold. Gross weight 4.30 grams.
Dimensions: 1-1/8 inches x 3/4 inch

Condition Report*: Metals:
Gold

Overall Condition: Very Good
Condition Notes: The Pre-Columbian pendant has a modern gold-plated bail attached at the bail. The pendant is accompanied by a description from John Fay, President of Central American Art, San Jose, Costa Rica.

*Heritage Auctions strongly encourages in-person inspection of items by the bidder. Statements by Heritage regarding the condition of objects are for guidance only and should not be relied upon as statements of fact, and do not constitute a representation, warranty, or assumption of liability by Heritage. All lots offered are sold "AS IS".


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Мы привлекаем к этому партнеров по маркетингу и рекламе (которые могут располагать собранной ими самими информацией). Отказ не означает прекращения демонстрации рекламы Etsy или изменений в алгоритмах персонализации Etsy, но может привести к тому, что реклама будет повторяться чаще и станет менее актуальной. Подробнее в нашей Политике в отношении файлов Cookie и схожих технологий.


A Chiriqui Gold Eagle Pendant.

Cast and hammered tumbaga eagle with the unusual feature of a small creature in its beak. Long and wide tail feathers, curved wings, long ears with tufts beneath and two tufts of feathers at top of head. In very good condition, casting flaw between eyes not affecting the visual appeal of the piece.

Cf: Metropolitan Museum #1977.187.22 for another example of a Pre-Columbian gold eagle with a creature in its beak.

Provenance:
A Los Angeles private collection. Reportedly collected in Costa Rica in the 1930s and passed by descent.

Height: 2 ½ inches
Weight: 28.34 grams
Tests for 14kt gold

*Heritage Auctions strives to provide as much information as possible but encourages in-person inspection by bidders. Statements regarding the condition of objects are only for general guidance and should not be relied upon as complete statements of fact, and do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by Heritage. Some condition issues may not be noted in the condition report but are apparent in the provided photos which are considered part of the condition report. Please note that we do not de-frame lots estimated at $1,000 or less and may not be able to provide additional details for lots valued under $500. Heritage does not guarantee the condition of frames and shall not be liable for any damage/scratches to frames, glass/acrylic coverings, original boxes, display accessories, or art that has slipped in frames. All lots are sold "AS IS" under the Terms & Conditions of Auction.


Contact us

The information about this object, including provenance information, is based on historic information and may not be currently accurate or complete. Research on objects is an ongoing process, but the information about this object may not reflect the most current information available to CMA. If you notice a mistake or have additional information about this object, please email [email protected]

To request more information about this object, study images, or bibliography, contact the Ingalls Library Reference Desk.


General Description

Among the societies of Central America, gold ornaments were important symbols of power and prestige that expressed authority and status in life and in death. Made to be suspended around the neck, the image on this gold pendant is flattened and bilaterally symmetrical for maximum decorative effect. The circular front feet form the suspension loops—craftsmen thus cleverly adapted the natural forms of totemic creatures to the functional demands of this jewelry. This pendant likely represents a jaguar with a large mouth and curved tail.

Pendants in the shape of felines and other animal creatures are a common theme among the cultures of Intermediate Central America. Depicted in a variety of sizes and styles, they sometimes represent a fusion of various animal features and species. Though their exact meaning is unknown, pendants were likely worn on ceremonial occasions, and similar pendants were still being worn at the beginning of the 16th-century conquest. For many peoples of the ancient Americas, jaguars and other large felines were likely considered mythic figures. Feline pendants may have thus offered protection to the wearer, and when represented in gold, such as this example, they are even more powerful.

Bonnie Pitman, ed., "Pendant with two frogs (1976.W.292), Pendant bell depicting a turtle (1976.W.301), Pendant depicting a batlike mask (1976.W.237)," in Dallas Museum of Art: A Guide to the Collection (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2012), 35.

Anne R. Bromberg, Dallas Museum of Art: Selected Works (Dallas, TX: Dallas Museum of Art, 1983), 45.

Carol Robbins, Label text [1976.W.298 1976.W.297 1976.W.292], A. H. Meadows Galleries.


Diquis

The Diquis culture (sometimes spelled Diquís) was a pre-Columbian indigenous culture of Costa Rica that flourished from AD 700 to 1530. [1] The word "diquís" means "great waters" or "great river" in the Boruca language. [1] The Diquis formed part of the Greater Chiriqui culture that spanned from southern Costa Rica to western Panama. [2]

The Diquis are known for stone spheres, sometimes referred to as the Diquís Spheres, an assortment of over three hundred petrospheres in Costa Rica, located on the Diquis Delta and on Isla del Caño.

  1. ^ ab"Diquís". Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino . Retrieved 25 March 2012 .
  2. ^
  3. Drolet, Robert P. (1992). "The House and the Territory: The Organizational Structure for Chiefdom Art in the Diquis Subregion of Greater Chiriqui". In Lange, Frederick W. (ed.). Wealth and Hierarchy in the Intermediate Area: A Symposium at Dumbarton Oaks, 10th and 11th October 1987 . Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection. pp. 207–241. ISBN0884021912 .

Media related to Diquis culture at Wikimedia Commons

    , an exhibition catalog from The Metropolitan Museum of Art (available online as PDF), which contains material on Diquis culture

This Costa Rica-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

This article relating to the Indigenous peoples of North America is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.


Antique, Vintage and Estate Jewelry

Estate Jewelry describes pieces that were previously owned, it sounds more elegant than used or old jewelry. Both vintage and antique are types of estate jewellery. Antique Jewelry is typically at least 100 years old but often Art Deco jewels crafted during the 1920's to 1930's are included. Fine antique jewelry is generally made of either yellow gold or platinum. Vintage Jewelry describes items that are at least one generation old, so anything before the 1980's is currently considered vintage. Many think of costume jewellery when they hear vintage jewelry however, between the 1940's and 1980's some of the finest crafted jewelry pieces were produced. Customers normally ask if we get items from estate sales. Not usually is the answer. Some items come from trusts, but most fine pre-owned pieces come from the family members that inherited them or original owners that no longer want or need them. Please enjoy our selection whether just admiring the artwork, or searching for your treasure!


Contact us

The information about this object, including provenance information, is based on historic information and may not be currently accurate or complete. Research on objects is an ongoing process, but the information about this object may not reflect the most current information available to CMA. If you notice a mistake or have additional information about this object, please email [email protected]

To request more information about this object, study images, or bibliography, contact the Ingalls Library Reference Desk.


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